Saturday, 30 September 2017 18:07

Fit Farmer Support

So often it is not until crisis strikes that any of us seek help. Often working in isolation, and wanting to appear resilient and robust, regardless of the situation, we are reluctant to seek help and support.  Living in a rural community means available support services can be limited. The other issue is it can be hard to know what all these support services offer.

Upper Lachlan Landcare wanted to deliver a day with the community to inform people about what support services are available locally. Not only did we want to let people know where to turn when crisis strikes, but also what to do long before. We wanted people to take a break and check in with themselves. Ask themselves; Am I taking enough time out of my busy life for fun, relaxation, fitness? Am I giving myself every opportunity to be the best that I can be?

People attending our Fit Farmer Workshop on Friday had the opportunity to see and hear a wealth of information all in one space. Support services themselves even commented that it was so helpful for them to find out about other agencies and the support they offer. Some people went away simply with an extra spring in their step, while others felt a deeper response. Either way, feedback from the day was all very positive and worthwhile. We are now looking forward to planning next years!

 

Wednesday, 30 August 2017 15:08

Limerick School Tree Planting

Same place. Same time of year. Same person. Just 80 years later.

Students of Limerick School, planted a row of Tasmania Blue Gums (provenance bicostata) leading from the Peelwood Road up towards the schoolhouse. This was in 1937.

“The teacher must have been pretty on the ball to have us kids planting these trees when many trees in the area were being ringbarked and cleared”, recalls Eric Hurn.

Eric Hurn and Olive Treacy, were allocated the task of nurturing one of these trees which is still standing proud today, 80 years later. Those “occasional buckets of water” Eric described must have done the trick!

This clearly inspired something in Eric. He went on to plant thousands of trees on his grazing and potato growing property near Roslyn. In conjunction with Roslyn Landcare and Local Land Services, Eric also hosts a planting day each year with local primary school students on the Broken Bridge Traveling Stock Reserve. Continuing the legacy started back at the Limerick School.

Clearing was conducted throughout the Upper Lachlan Shire, as was the case in many parts of Australia. The remanent stands of original forest and woodland we see today are invariably on the poorer, or lighter country, like hilltops. These areas were last to be considered when clearing, and fortunately many were never cleared. These areas now provide valuable refuge for many woodland birds, reptiles and mammals, like the spikey echidna.

“These days people see all the trees we plant and think how much better the countryside looks. Which is true, but they don’t know how much is missing.” Observes Eric. “We had the clearest creeks and freshest air, plenty of bird life, and this was all down to the trees.”

So, by the sounds of things, we still have a long way to go to restore a better balance between open paddocks and woodlands.

Eric will celebrate his 90th birthday in a few days. We wish you a very happy birthday Eric and are truly grateful to have such a visionary in our community.

Thursday, 25 May 2017 11:05

More than Just Erosion Control

Upper Lachlan Landcare has been fortunate to have yet another expert in our midst! Cam Wilson from Earth Integral, has recently hosted 2 workshops. Cam’s workshops explain how water moves through the landscape, the erosion process and demonstrates how to stabilise small active erosion cuts.

Sunday, 14 May 2017 21:53

Managing the Riparian Area

The Riparian area is the space between the stream, river, watercourse and the land. A healthy, functioning riparian area contains dense ground cover and a variety of plant species.

The benefits of a healthy riparian area include improved water quality, reduced erosion, increased wildlife habitat for native birds, insects and reptiles, and increased shade and shelter options for stock management. Ideally the riparian area should be a least 25m wide.

Thursday, 16 March 2017 21:37

Colin Seis is coming to Upper Lachlan

We are very excited to welcome Colin Seis to the Upper Lachlan Shire. In January 2015, The Weekly Times, wrote an article titled “Six of the world’s influential farming trailblazers share success secrets”. Colin Seis was one of those 6 trailblazers.

In 2005 Colin won the NSW Conservation Farmer of the year award and in 2007 he won the inaugural “Carbon farmer of the year award” in NSW. He was the recipient of the 2014 Bob Hawke award for Landcare.

Tuesday, 21 February 2017 15:56

Paddock Trees

Paddock trees are those ancient trees branching out over the paddock providing shade on hot sunny days. Often they can be hundreds of years old. Not only do they provide shade for stock, but also a home for a variety of creatures such as birds, lizards, bats and gliders. These creatures can have a significant impact on devouring insect pests. Studies have also shown that improved water infiltration and nutrient cycling occurs in paddocks with a scattering of trees.